"I highly recommend Sir Fix It Handyman. They are so great to work with. The job before mine took longer than expected due to things being added. I received communication almost immediately regarding the situation. As my job was not imperative I offered to reschedule so Joel could go on with the appointment after mine. We rescheduled me for the next day, today, and Joel was here, did the job beyond expectations, and at a reasonable price. I will definitely use them in the future if a need arises."
“They gave me a four-day-week, three-year contract, so I knew I wouldn’t have to commit for a long time,” said Richardson. “At that point, I had my kids four days a week, [Ray] had them three days, so there was only one day when I was working and had them. I did that show for three years, but then we changed the custody agreement and it got rough, so I left.”

Depending on where you live, national averages can seem like a steal. Rene Artale’s four-bedroom house near Newcastle, in Westchester County, N.Y., suffered some damage during a storm last winter. A tree fell in the yard, damaging her fence, arbor and retaining wall. And heavy snow caused her roof to leak. The repair bills just kept piling up. Removing the tree, $3,800. Repairing the wall, $4,000. Fixing the roof, $3,800. Fixing the picket fence, $2,800. “It’s obscene,” Ms. Artale, 47, said.


You might think that an experienced handyman could do a job faster than an inexperienced one. However, consider that some jobs don’t take that long and most don’t involve serious complications. The $60 an hour handyman who just opened his business will probably take about the same time as the $125 an hour handyman who has 30 years in the business, and both will probably have no trouble on a small job like changing cabinetry hardware. However, a more complex job -- hanging entirely new cabinets or replacing kitchen countertops -- may benefit from an experienced handyman.

In the show's eighth season and final season, the middle child Randy left for an environmental study program in Costa Rica in the episode "Adios", which aired on September 29, 1998. This was done because Jonathan Taylor Thomas reportedly wanted to take time off to focus on academics. His last appearance on Home Improvement was the eighth and final season's Christmas episode "Home for the Holidays", which aired on December 8, 1998. He did not return to the show for the series finale, aired in May 1999, only appearing in archived footage. He was shooting the film Speedway Junky for release that summer. His character was not replaced.


In our efforts to replace our gas grill (we simply wore it out) we found that the space in our grill island on our covered patio had some changes needed to fit the new one (a Turbo from BBQs Galore, themselves a winning team). To comply with newish state regulations we would be required to provide venting under the grill for gas to escape in the case of a leak. Enter Patti, Phillip, and Taylor in that order.
How to DIY it: There are lots of ways to clear a drain, so start with the easiest one. If your sink has a pop-up stopper, remove that and clean it. If that doesn’t do the trick, fill the sink with 3 or 4 inches of water and use a plunger to plunge the sink (plug the overflow hole with a wet rag first). Still slow? Try snaking the drain pipe with a metal hanger or a pipe-cleaning tool (sold at hardware stores for about $2).
I have spent many a year watching reruns of this show, catching bits and pieces of it at times. Now I can play the dvd when I want to and pause if I need to. I love this show. I love the idea behind the story, I love all of the characters, the idea of a family consisting of a father who represents true machismo by wanting more more power is just hilarious, and the fact he is so dang funny adds great character to the show. I appreciate also the fact that certain basic storyline facts are based on Tim Allen's life, and I like how that tied in to the show. It is a funny and heartfelt show that I will always love watching with my family.
Depending on where you live, national averages can seem like a steal. Rene Artale’s four-bedroom house near Newcastle, in Westchester County, N.Y., suffered some damage during a storm last winter. A tree fell in the yard, damaging her fence, arbor and retaining wall. And heavy snow caused her roof to leak. The repair bills just kept piling up. Removing the tree, $3,800. Repairing the wall, $4,000. Fixing the roof, $3,800. Fixing the picket fence, $2,800. “It’s obscene,” Ms. Artale, 47, said.
First, Patti took my call and was able to have Phillip come by that afternoon. He sized up the problem and proposed that he come back the next day to execute his solution. He brought Taylor with him on Saturday and they proposed a professional design for venting slits which they began working on immediately. We agreed to have Phillip take the door home and finish it up and paint it, then bring it back the next day which by now you have figured out was Sunday. It looks like it was custom manufactured for us. And, indeed, it really was.
How to DIY it: You should already be emptying the lint trap before every load of laundry. To do a thorough cleaning of the dryer and its vent duct system, unplug the machine (and turn off the gas valve if it has one). Pry off the access panel on the front (try a putty knife covered with duct tape to prevent scratching) and vacuum around the motor and heating element (above). Then carefully disconnect the vent duct tubing from the back of the dryer and use a dryer vent brush (about $10 at home 
centers; look for one that also cleans refrigerator coils) to pull out any 
accumulated lint. Aim to do this at least once a year.
Frank helped us replace our condo building mailboxes. This was a tough job and hard to do without coordination with the post office but Frank was patient, careful and persistent and even took extra care to ensure the new installed boxes were level and fitted properly. He's pleasant to work with and I would surely recommend him for all you handyman needs.
Need your garage door repaired? Odds are, once you account for materials, labor and unforeseen hiccups, you’ll be writing a check for a grand. Your sump pump died? A new one could cost you around $600 for parts and labor, which doesn’t seem so bad considering the alternative is a flooded basement. But then the plumber might discover that the pipe carrying the water from the house to the street is clogged with years’ of debris and needs to be flushed out. And maybe there’s a blockage somewhere. There you have it: $1,000.
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