By providing affordable home repairs, our Home Repair Program preserves homeownership for low-income residents while alleviating critical health and safety concerns. With our skilled construction staff and the enlisted help of volunteers, qualified homeowners can find help with a variety of interior and exterior repairs. Partnering homeowners are left with a new sense of pride and the ability to enjoy their homes for years to come.

How to DIY it: You should already be emptying the lint trap before every load of laundry. To do a thorough cleaning of the dryer and its vent duct system, unplug the machine (and turn off the gas valve if it has one). Pry off the access panel on the front (try a putty knife covered with duct tape to prevent scratching) and vacuum around the motor and heating element (above). Then carefully disconnect the vent duct tubing from the back of the dryer and use a dryer vent brush (about $10 at home 
centers; look for one that also cleans refrigerator coils) to pull out any 
accumulated lint. Aim to do this at least once a year.
Generally the job of paid handyman is low status, a semi-skilled labor job. It's a less prestigious occupation than a specialist such as a plumber, electrician, or carpenter. With the emergence of large national chains, an effort is being made to change that perception, by emphasizing professionalism and the fact that a handyman is actually a technician with multiple skills and a wide range of knowledge. At the same time, unpaid homeowners skilled at repairs are valued for saving money. And handyman tools sometimes become useful in different places: for example, when a proper neurological drill was not available, an Australian doctor used a handyman's drill in 2009 to open a hole in the head of a 13-year-old boy to relieve pressure after a brain injury; the boy's life was saved.[11]

Categories: Home Improvement (TV series)1990s American sitcoms1991 American television series debuts1999 American television series endingsAmerican Broadcasting Company network showsEnglish-language television programsHome renovation television seriesTelevision programs adapted into video gamesTelevision series about familiesTelevision series about televisionTelevision series by ABC StudiosTelevision shows set in Detroit


I have spent many a year watching reruns of this show, catching bits and pieces of it at times. Now I can play the dvd when I want to and pause if I need to. I love this show. I love the idea behind the story, I love all of the characters, the idea of a family consisting of a father who represents true machismo by wanting more more power is just hilarious, and the fact he is so dang funny adds great character to the show. I appreciate also the fact that certain basic storyline facts are based on Tim Allen's life, and I like how that tied in to the show. It is a funny and heartfelt show that I will always love watching with my family.
Long story short(ish), after choosing AFJ in the beginning of October to put in my attic ladder, I finally have it installed, finished and approved as of December 14th . Yep, two and a half months to get an attic ladder put in. It started with the contractor coming out to do the install and telling me that he needed to get a permit after I had already told them that I needed to cut through the joists which is why I didn't want to do it myself. One month of them dragging their feet getting a permit approved with me having to constantly ask for updates. One month of the contractor having to come back 4 more times because the inspection failed... twice! I get the bill for the initial job which took 4 maybe 5 hours. They billed me 11.25 hours. I called to have them specify to which I was told they had to bill for the drawings and only billed me for the cost of the permit. So basically from their explanation, they billed me 6 hours to do some drawings and take them in to get a permit which they even had to redraw because the first draft wasn't good enough. But hey! They wanted to point out that they took $100 off because of the hassle which is why I'm giving them 2 stars instead of one. I would have even given 3 stars but they sent me the bill multiple times before the final work was even approved. Oh not to mention I had to take time off work for the second inspection because the first visit failed.
The complete first season of Home Improvement takes us back to the very beginning of the show. We meet Tim "The Tool Man" Taylor, the host of a local cable home improvement show, his wife Jill and their three kids. While much of the show dealt with the television show, the prime focus was on the family aspect of Tim's life and how it affected his work and vice versa.
These are the most involved of handyman jobs and include wiring for a home theater, installing heating and cooling registers, wall repair or installing a kitchen sink with all of the elements. Generally, if you’re wondering if you need a handyman or a contractor for a particular job, it’s probably considered a large job. These jobs can take from 4 hours to a couple of days to finish depending on the complexity.
Whether you’re a busy professional or a stay-at-home parent, Handy knows that your time is precious. When you book handyman services through Handy, you can be sure that they’ll show up on time and ready to take care of your handyman tasks as quickly and efficiently as possible. You’ll find them fully equipped and with all the necessary skills to get things done. In the meantime, you can use that time to get some extra work done or take the kids down to the park. Using Handy means that your odd jobs and home repairs get done, while you focus on the important things in life.
How to DIY it: Take off the loose bar by removing the screws on each of the posts that mount the bar to the wall. (If one side is solidly attached, leave it alone.) With the mounting plate now exposed, try tightening 
the screws in it. If that doesn’t work, remove it. Chances are you’ll find two plastic anchors underneath. Poke them with 
a screwdriver and let them fall inside the wall. Replace with bigger, stronger metal toggle 
anchors (above), sold at hardware stores. Just drive them into the existing holes with a drill 
or a screwdriver, and then re­attach everything.
"He even texted in advance saying he was running about an hour late from a previous job, so I wasn't left sitting at home wondering where he was. I understand service guys have those kind of delay issues, but he obviously understands us customers appreciate communication when things get off schedule. I'll be calling him again when a need arises. Dan R"
Brad, popular and athletic, was often the moving factor, who engaged before thinking, a tendency which regularly landed him in trouble. Randy, a year younger, was the comedian of the pack, known for his quick-thinking, wisecracks, and smart mouth. He had more common sense than Brad but was not immune to trouble. Mark was somewhat of a mama's boy, though later in the series (in the seventh season) he grew into a teenage outcast who dressed in black clothing. Meanwhile, Brad became interested in cars like his father and took up soccer. Randy joined the school drama club, and later the school newspaper, in the eighth season, he left for Costa Rica.
If you have shallow scratches or nicks, hide them with a stain-filled touch-up marker. Dab on the stain and wipe off the excess with a rag. But beware: Scratches can absorb lots of stain and turn darker than the surrounding finish. So start with a marker that’s lighter than your cabinet finish and then switch to a darker shade if needed. For deeper scratches, use a filler pencil, which fills and colors the scratch. Or, try using a walnut to remove scratches in wood!
Brad, popular and athletic, was often the moving factor, who engaged before thinking, a tendency which regularly landed him in trouble. Randy, a year younger, was the comedian of the pack, known for his quick-thinking, wisecracks, and smart mouth. He had more common sense than Brad but was not immune to trouble. Mark was somewhat of a mama's boy, though later in the series (in the seventh season) he grew into a teenage outcast who dressed in black clothing. Meanwhile, Brad became interested in cars like his father and took up soccer. Randy joined the school drama club, and later the school newspaper, in the eighth season, he left for Costa Rica.
Frank helped us replace our condo building mailboxes. This was a tough job and hard to do without coordination with the post office but Frank was patient, careful and persistent and even took extra care to ensure the new installed boxes were level and fitted properly. He's pleasant to work with and I would surely recommend him for all you handyman needs.
In general, an experienced handyman knows how long a job should take and may give you a flat rate based on that. If he knows a particular job will take about an hour, he may present his hourly rate as a flat rate. If he knows it will take two hours, he may give you the rate for two hours as a flat rate. Naturally, this is incentive for the handyman to work quickly, and keeping a happy customer is an incentive to do the job well.
In Canada, it previously aired on CTV from the beginning to the ending (1991–1999), as well as CMT and YTV. In Germany and Austria, Home Improvement has been shown in dubbing under the title Hör mal wer da hämmert ("Listen who's hammering"). It ran on ARD (1993–1995), RTL (1996–2006), RTL II (1999–2000, 2007–2012), VOX (2004–2006), and Super RTL (2008–2009). Currently, reruns in Germany air Mondays at 15:20 hours (3:20 p.m. German time) on RTL Nitro.[76] In Austria, reruns aired for a period of time on ATV. It was also shown on M-Net in South Africa.
Home Improvement had been in the works between Tim Allen and the writing/producing team of Carmen Finestra, David McFadzean, and Matt Williams since the summer of 1990. Originally, the project's proposed title was Hammer Time, both a play on the catchphrase made popular by artist MC Hammer and the name of the fictional fix-it show within the series, which was also called Hammer Time. By the time ABC committed to the project in early 1991, Allen and his team had already changed the title to Home Improvement. The show hosted by Tim Taylor in the shooting script for Home Improvement was still called Hammer Time when the first pilot with Frances Fisher was filmed in April 1991. The catalyst for the series' name change was to represent the aspect of fixing problems within the family and home life, as well as the use of mechanics and tools. Once the second phase of the pilot was produced, with all the actors that made the final cut into the series (including Patricia Richardson), Tim Taylor's Hammer Time became Tool Time.
On May 10, 2011, Walt Disney Studios released a complete series box set entitled Home Improvement: 20th Anniversary Complete Collection on DVD in Region 1. The 25-disc collection features all 204 episodes of the series as well as all special features contained on the previously released season sets; it is encased in special collectible packaging, a Home Improvement toolbox with a Binford "All-In-One Tool" tape measure.[79]
Silicone dries quickly and invisibly and doesn’t attract dirt, making it a good lubricant for drawer rollers, window tracks, door locks, bike parts, and other plastic, metal and rubber surfaces. It also helps protect metal against rust. Lithium grease is a long-lasting, weather-resistant (though somewhat messy) lubricant for garage door tracks, car doors and latches, and other metal parts that get heavy use outside. Check out 20 brilliant ways to use WD-40, another must-have lubricant for home repairs.
A Texas handyman license is required for jobs that involve more than basic skills, such as HVAC, electrical, or plumbing work. This might involve professional training and separate licensing for each skill. Jobs that cost more than $20,000 to complete require a handyman contractor license. Additionally, the handyman must hold an occupational license, pass a state exam, and provide proof of insurance.
A handyman who works independently will usually charge around $60 to $65 an hour on average. Depending on where you live the actual price range can run from $55 to $75 for an independent operator. A handyman who is part of a larger business can charge up to $125 an hour or more. The advantage to this is that he is expected to have a lot more expertise and meet a certain standard.
“They gave me a four-day-week, three-year contract, so I knew I wouldn’t have to commit for a long time,” said Richardson. “At that point, I had my kids four days a week, [Ray] had them three days, so there was only one day when I was working and had them. I did that show for three years, but then we changed the custody agreement and it got rough, so I left.”
Homeowners tend to have a long list of smaller home repairs that never seem to get done. Many of us lack the time, expertise and tools to do home improvement tasks, including carpentry work, painting, installing windows and railings, adjusting doors, cleaning out gutters, repairing drywall and assembling furniture on their own. When it comes to finding a handyman, Austin homeowners look to the experts at ABC to get the job done right the first time.
Categories: Home Improvement (TV series)1990s American sitcoms1991 American television series debuts1999 American television series endingsAmerican Broadcasting Company network showsEnglish-language television programsHome renovation television seriesTelevision programs adapted into video gamesTelevision series about familiesTelevision series about televisionTelevision series by ABC StudiosTelevision shows set in Detroit
Great guy! I have been using Phillip for a few years now (after running through a list of handymen - who would not show up/postpone etc). Phillip shows up ON time - which is a very big deal to me. He advises properly on only the things that need to be done. Does not oversell/overdo things. He explains things patiently. Charges very nominally. And is clean. That is all I can ask for. And with 2 kids at home - I still feel safe when he is at home, working !! You can't go wrong with Phillip.
Eric with AFJ was with us for most of the day and he did a fantastic job!  He put a desk together, took care of some heavy wall hangings, and did some wall and window sill repair with painting.  He was helpful and friendly.  The AFJ office manager was also easy to work with and get our appointment set up.  We are very happy and will plan on calling again!
Bob Vila also appeared on several episodes, with Tim seeing him as a rival (he appears in Season One's "What About Bob?" Season Two's "The Great Race," Season Three's "The Great Race II," Season Four's "Tool Time After Dark," with recycled Tool Time footage from earlier episodes, and Season Six's "Insult to Injury" in a dream sequence about Vila winning the consecutive home renovation show appearance record; Vila wasn't played by himself, and instead played by a stunt-double for a one-shot cameo). 

Everyone has a different skill set, and not everyone was put on this planet with the same aptitude for manual labor. And that’s okay! Whatever your needs, the Handy platform can connect you with the right professionals who won’t be daunted by your task, whatever it might be. Whether you need help with a door that won’t close, a squeaky hinge, drywall repair, or fixing a broken table leg, we’ve got you covered.  You can’t go wrong with Handy—let us connect you with a top-rated handyman with the right skills for your job.
Sooner or later, every sprayed ceiling is going to get a water stain or a scrape. Spray texture in a can won’t perfectly match every ceiling texture, but it’s usually close, and a lot easier than respraying a whole ceiling. Before spraying, seal the patch with a stain-blocking primer, cover the floor and furniture, and practice your technique on scrap plywood or cardboard. Buy ceiling texture on Amazon now.
Many people can do common household repairs. There are resources on the Internet, as well as do-it-yourself guide books,[8] with instructions about how to complete a wide range of projects. Sometimes the fix-it skill is seen as genetic, and people lacking such skills are said to "lack the handy-man gene".[9] One trend is that fewer homeowners are inclined to do fix-up jobs, perhaps because of time constraints, perhaps because of lack of interest; one reporter commented "my family's fix-it gene petered out before it reached my generation."[10] 
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