Home Improvement was one of the last great family shows. While it was laugh out loud funny, it also manages to touch your heart frequently. The production value of season 1 may not have been quite as high as successive seasons, but it detracts little, if any from this family classic. For those looking for quality clean entertainment for raising your family on today, I highly recommend Home Improvement as an option that will span the generations. Start with season 1, and get your family hooked from the beginning!
“My first job in New York was [on Broadway in 1974’s] ‘Gypsy,’ and then I didn’t work for a year,” said Richardson. “If you did musicals, they sort of didn’t take you seriously as an actor. I’m not that great of a singer, but I can belt! Growing up we moved a lot, and we were always in the church choir. I was also in school choruses, so I grew up singing with people and that’s still my favorite thing to do.”
Dab any type of kitchen cooking oil (olive, canola or sunflower) onto a paper towel. Then lay the paper towel over the residue that refuses to budge. Wait a few minutes while the oil works to dissolve the stubborn glue. Finally, remove the towel and rub away the sticker residue with another clean paper towel. However, you need to be cautious with stains on more absorbent materials.
Other competitors include online referral services.[10] In addition, some large home centers offer installation services for products such as cabinets and carpet installation.[16] Sometimes homeowners contact a professional service after trying, but failing, to do repair work themselves; in one instance, a Minneapolis homeowner attempted a project but called a technician to finish the project, and the overall cost was substantial.[19]
Almost nothing is quicker, easier or refreshes a room more than a new coat of paint. Even switching up a bright white for a trendy, bright grey can change your whole perspective and give you a starting point for new colors and decoration. Gallons of paint range from $30-$50, and with primer/paint combinations, you will likely only need a gallon or less to finish an average sized room. Add another $10, and you’ll be set with rollers, paint brushes, and painter’s tape. This DIY repair could potentially save you thousands over the cost of a professional painter. Short on time? Click here to learn how to paint a room fast.
In the first two years of the show, Pamela Anderson played the part of Tim's Tool Girl, Lisa, on Tool Time, but left the show to focus on her role on the syndicated series Baywatch. Her last episode as a series regular was "The Great Race", which aired on May 19, 1993. Tim's new assistant, Heidi, played by Debbe Dunning, replaced Anderson as the Tool Time Girl for the following third season, starting with "Maybe Baby", which aired on September 15, 1993. Anderson did reprise the role of Lisa on the sixth-season finale episode "The Kiss and the Kiss-Off", which aired on May 20, 1997.
Home Improvement had been in the works between Tim Allen and the writing/producing team of Carmen Finestra, David McFadzean, and Matt Williams since the summer of 1990. Originally, the project's proposed title was Hammer Time, both a play on the catchphrase made popular by artist MC Hammer and the name of the fictional fix-it show within the series, which was also called Hammer Time. By the time ABC committed to the project in early 1991, Allen and his team had already changed the title to Home Improvement. The show hosted by Tim Taylor in the shooting script for Home Improvement was still called Hammer Time when the first pilot with Frances Fisher was filmed in April 1991. The catalyst for the series' name change was to represent the aspect of fixing problems within the family and home life, as well as the use of mechanics and tools. Once the second phase of the pilot was produced, with all the actors that made the final cut into the series (including Patricia Richardson), Tim Taylor's Hammer Time became Tool Time.
Long story short(ish), after choosing AFJ in the beginning of October to put in my attic ladder, I finally have it installed, finished and approved as of December 14th . Yep, two and a half months to get an attic ladder put in. It started with the contractor coming out to do the install and telling me that he needed to get a permit after I had already told them that I needed to cut through the joists which is why I didn't want to do it myself. One month of them dragging their feet getting a permit approved with me having to constantly ask for updates. One month of the contractor having to come back 4 more times because the inspection failed... twice! I get the bill for the initial job which took 4 maybe 5 hours. They billed me 11.25 hours. I called to have them specify to which I was told they had to bill for the drawings and only billed me for the cost of the permit. So basically from their explanation, they billed me 6 hours to do some drawings and take them in to get a permit which they even had to redraw because the first draft wasn't good enough. But hey! They wanted to point out that they took $100 off because of the hassle which is why I'm giving them 2 stars instead of one. I would have even given 3 stars but they sent me the bill multiple times before the final work was even approved. Oh not to mention I had to take time off work for the second inspection because the first visit failed.
How to DIY it: Gently tug the loose part of the carpet to find the point where it’s still attached. Snip 
it off as close to the backing as possible and save it. Use painter’s tape to surround the repair area. Squeeze 
a heavy bead of carpet seam sealer (about $6 at home centers) into the run. Then fill in the hole with the saved fiber, using a screwdriver to press it into the sealer bit by bit until the area looks like the surrounding 
carpet (below).
Long story short(ish), after choosing AFJ in the beginning of October to put in my attic ladder, I finally have it installed, finished and approved as of December 14th . Yep, two and a half months to get an attic ladder put in. It started with the contractor coming out to do the install and telling me that he needed to get a permit after I had already told them that I needed to cut through the joists which is why I didn't want to do it myself. One month of them dragging their feet getting a permit approved with me having to constantly ask for updates. One month of the contractor having to come back 4 more times because the inspection failed... twice! I get the bill for the initial job which took 4 maybe 5 hours. They billed me 11.25 hours. I called to have them specify to which I was told they had to bill for the drawings and only billed me for the cost of the permit. So basically from their explanation, they billed me 6 hours to do some drawings and take them in to get a permit which they even had to redraw because the first draft wasn't good enough. But hey! They wanted to point out that they took $100 off because of the hassle which is why I'm giving them 2 stars instead of one. I would have even given 3 stars but they sent me the bill multiple times before the final work was even approved. Oh not to mention I had to take time off work for the second inspection because the first visit failed.
How to DIY it: You should already be emptying the lint trap before every load of laundry. To do a thorough cleaning of the dryer and its vent duct system, unplug the machine (and turn off the gas valve if it has one). Pry off the access panel on the front (try a putty knife covered with duct tape to prevent scratching) and vacuum around the motor and heating element (above). Then carefully disconnect the vent duct tubing from the back of the dryer and use a dryer vent brush (about $10 at home 
centers; look for one that also cleans refrigerator coils) to pull out any 
accumulated lint. Aim to do this at least once a year.

Another related issue for avoiding costly repairs (or disasters) is the proper operation of a home, including systems and appliances, in a way that prevents damage or prolongs their usefulness. For example, at higher latitudes, even a clean rain gutter can suddenly build up an ice dam in winter, forcing melt water into unprotected roofing, resulting in leaks or even flooding inside walls or rooms. This can be prevented by installing moisture barrier beneath the roofing tiles. A wary home-owner should be alert to the conditions that can result in larger problems and take remedial action before damage or injury occurs. It may be easier to tack down a bit of worn carpet than repair a large patch damaged by prolonged misuse. Another example is to seek out the source of unusual noises or smells when mechanical, electrical or plumbing systems are operating—sometimes they indicate incipient problems. One should avoid overloading or otherwise misusing systems, and a recurring overload may indicate time for an upgrade.


The theme music for Home Improvement was composed by Dan Foliart. The theme song is unique for its sampling of power tools, most notably an electric drill and jackhammer, which is heard during the theme song. Tim's grunting was also sampled for the theme song. The flute and organ parts of the theme music were also used. From Season 7 until the end of the series, a remixed version of the theme song was used.
How to DIY it: You should already be emptying the lint trap before every load of laundry. To do a thorough cleaning of the dryer and its vent duct system, unplug the machine (and turn off the gas valve if it has one). Pry off the access panel on the front (try a putty knife covered with duct tape to prevent scratching) and vacuum around the motor and heating element (above). Then carefully disconnect the vent duct tubing from the back of the dryer and use a dryer vent brush (about $10 at home 
centers; look for one that also cleans refrigerator coils) to pull out any 
accumulated lint. Aim to do this at least once a year.
Each episode includes Tim's own Binford-sponsored home improvement show, called Tool Time, a show-within-a-show. In hosting this show, Tim is joined by his friend and mild-mannered assistant Al Borland (Richard Karn), and a "Tool Time girl"—first Lisa (Pamela Anderson) and later Heidi (Debbe Dunning)—whose main duty is to introduce the pair at the beginning of the show with the line "Does everybody know what time it is?" In reply, the audience yells, "TOOL TIME!" The Tool Time girl also assists Tim and Al during the show by bringing them tools.

An immediate hit with both fans and critics, this classic family comedy earned an Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Comedy Series in its very first season and soon found its place among the most popular and acclaimed sitcoms in television history. Tim Allen ratchets up the laughs as Tim "The Toolman" Taylor in HOME IMPROVEMENT'S landmark first season. Relive every hilarious moment with the accident-prone TV show host and the original "Tool Time" girl Pamela Anderson, in this comprehensive 3-disc set, including all 24 episodes and exclusive bonus features. It's the show you love -- with "more power" than ever! 
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