During its eight-season run, the show always finished in the top 10 in the Nielsen ratings during a season, despite never making the #1 slot (its highest finish was a second-place spot in the show's third season). The series finale became the fifth highest-rated series finale television program of the 1990s and the ninth overall series finale ever presented on a single network in television history, watched by 35.5 percent of the households sampled in America, and 21.6 percent of television viewers.

Repairs often mean simple replacement of worn or used components intended to be periodically renewed by a home-owner, such as burnt out light bulbs, worn out batteries, or overfilled vacuum cleaner bags. Another class of home repairs relates to restoring something to a useful condition, such as sharpening tools or utensils, replacing leaky faucet washers, cleaning out plumbing traps, rain gutters. Because of the required precision, specialized tools, or hazards, some of these are best left to experts such as a plumber. One emergency repair that may be necessary in this area is overflowing toilets. Most of them have a shut-off valve on a pipe beneath or behind them so that the water supply can be turned off while repairs are made, either by removing a clog or repairing a broken mechanism.
Live in a condo or co-op in the city, and your monthly maintenance fee may be large enough to make you envy the owner of a single-family home. But that regular common charge means that you get to live in ignorant bliss about what it costs to keep a property functioning. You may never know when the gutters get cleaned, who gets hired to do the work or even how much the job costs. None of the details are your problem because the work just gets done whether you’re paying attention or not.
Before the first pilot was shot, actor John Bedford Lloyd was in the running for one of two roles; that of Tim's Tool Time assistant (originally named "Glen") and the role of Wilson. Bedford Lloyd eventually got the part of Wilson, but his agent later made claims that the actor was unaware that most of his scenes would require his face to be partially hidden behind a fence. For this reason, the crew received news just one day prior to taping the first pilot that Bedford-Lloyd had dropped out. Casting immediately contacted the other actor considered for the role, Earl Hindman.
Simple jobs are often small jobs, but even some larger jobs can be fairly simple. Changing an interior door knob is easy and a “small” job while sanding and re-hanging an interior door is a “medium” job, yet neither is particularly complex. Removing and replacing an old toilet, on the other hand, involves heavy lifting, plumbing knowledge and cleanup. If you aren’t sure about the complexity of the job, ask the handyman you are interviewing about what’s involved.
If you can’t see any telltale flow marks, and since the stain is fairly small, look at the underside of the roof for ‘shiners.’ A shiner is a nail that missed the framing member, in this case when the carpenter nailed the roof sheathing to the rafters. Moisture that escapes into the cold attic from the rooms below often condenses on cold nails. Sometimes you can spot this if you climb up into your attic on a cold night. The nails will look white because they’re frosted. When the attic heats up a bit during the day, the frost melts and drips, then the nails frost up at night again and so on. The solution is to simply clip the nail with a side-cutting pliers.
When the kitchen faucet leaks, you can’t just call the super. Instead, you have to find a handyman willing to do the work — unless you want to figure out how fix it yourself. But that would mean spending half a day at Home Depot wandering around the plumbing aisle. Buy the wrong materials and you may be back at the store a week later, or calling that handyman anyway to fix your mistake.

Robert Picardo made two appearances on the show as Tim's neighbor, Joe "The Meat Man" Morton. He appeared in "A Sew, Sew Evening," and "Blow-Up," both early on in the third season. It was explained by Joe's wife Marie (Mariangela Pino) in the fifth-season episode "Jill's Surprise Party" that he had left her for a younger woman who worked at his plant (Picardo was no longer available after being cast as The Doctor on Star Trek: Voyager).

Long story short(ish), after choosing AFJ in the beginning of October to put in my attic ladder, I finally have it installed, finished and approved as of December 14th . Yep, two and a half months to get an attic ladder put in. It started with the contractor coming out to do the install and telling me that he needed to get a permit after I had already told them that I needed to cut through the joists which is why I didn't want to do it myself. One month of them dragging their feet getting a permit approved with me having to constantly ask for updates. One month of the contractor having to come back 4 more times because the inspection failed... twice! I get the bill for the initial job which took 4 maybe 5 hours. They billed me 11.25 hours. I called to have them specify to which I was told they had to bill for the drawings and only billed me for the cost of the permit. So basically from their explanation, they billed me 6 hours to do some drawings and take them in to get a permit which they even had to redraw because the first draft wasn't good enough. But hey! They wanted to point out that they took $100 off because of the hassle which is why I'm giving them 2 stars instead of one. I would have even given 3 stars but they sent me the bill multiple times before the final work was even approved. Oh not to mention I had to take time off work for the second inspection because the first visit failed.

Many towns have handymen who work part-time, for friends or family or neighbors, who are skilled in a variety of tasks. Sometimes they advertise in newspapers or online. They vary in quality, professionalism, skill level, and price. Contractors often criticize the work of previous contractors, and this practice is not limited to handymen, but to all trades.[13] Handymen have advertised their services through flyers and mailings; in addition, free websites such as Craigslist and SkillSlate help customers and handymen find each other.[14]
Tired of listening to those cabinet doors bang shut? Peel-and-stick door and drawer bumpers are the solution. Get a pack of 20 at a home center for a few dollars or online at Amazon. Make sure the back of the door is clean so the bumpers will stick, then place one at the top corner and another at the bottom. Plus: Keep your kitchen (and whole house!) clean with these 100 brilliant cleaning hacks.
If you can’t see any telltale flow marks, and since the stain is fairly small, look at the underside of the roof for ‘shiners.’ A shiner is a nail that missed the framing member, in this case when the carpenter nailed the roof sheathing to the rafters. Moisture that escapes into the cold attic from the rooms below often condenses on cold nails. Sometimes you can spot this if you climb up into your attic on a cold night. The nails will look white because they’re frosted. When the attic heats up a bit during the day, the frost melts and drips, then the nails frost up at night again and so on. The solution is to simply clip the nail with a side-cutting pliers.
Other competitors include online referral services.[10] In addition, some large home centers offer installation services for products such as cabinets and carpet installation.[16] Sometimes homeowners contact a professional service after trying, but failing, to do repair work themselves; in one instance, a Minneapolis homeowner attempted a project but called a technician to finish the project, and the overall cost was substantial.[19]
If you can’t see any telltale flow marks, and since the stain is fairly small, look at the underside of the roof for ‘shiners.’ A shiner is a nail that missed the framing member, in this case when the carpenter nailed the roof sheathing to the rafters. Moisture that escapes into the cold attic from the rooms below often condenses on cold nails. Sometimes you can spot this if you climb up into your attic on a cold night. The nails will look white because they’re frosted. When the attic heats up a bit during the day, the frost melts and drips, then the nails frost up at night again and so on. The solution is to simply clip the nail with a side-cutting pliers.
Periodic maintenance also falls under the general class of home repairs. These are inspections, adjustments, cleaning, or replacements that should be done regularly to ensure proper functioning of all the systems in a house, and to avoid costly emergencies. Examples include annual testing and adjustment of alarm systems, central heating or cooling systems (electrodes, thermocouples, and fuel filters), replacement of water treatment components or air-handling filters, purging of heating radiators and water tanks, defrosting a freezer, vacuum refrigerator coils, refilling dry floor-drain traps with water, cleaning out rain gutters, down spouts and drains, touching up worn house paint and weather seals, and cleaning accumulated creosote out of chimney flues, which may be best left to a chimney sweep.
Many special guests made cameo appearances on Tool Time. These guests included race car drivers Johnny Rutherford, Robby Gordon, Mario and Michael Andretti, Al Unser, Sr./Jr./III, actress and model Jenny McCarthy (the season 8 episode "Young at Heart"), country artist Alan Jackson (the season 5 episode "When Harry Kept Delores"), golfer Payne Stewart (the season 7 episode "Futile Attraction") and comedian Drew Carey (the season 6 episode "Totally Tool Time", although not playing himself).
Inspect and replace your engine air filter. Just unscrew or unclip the air filter box retainers and remove the old filter. Then hold a shop light behind the filter to see how much light passes through. If the filter blocks 50 percent of more of the light, replace the filter. If not, put it back in, secure the air filter box cover and keep driving. Get the full step-by-step on changing your air filter here. It’s one of the easier things you can do to fix up cars.
With climate characteristics ranging from desert heat to tropical humidity, Austin is a veritable oasis of greenery situated along the Colorado River. Grand Victorian homes line many of the suburban streets, and as a result, handymen in this city often specialize in performing the careful work required to preserve historic houses. Most handymen provide services to a wide variety of neighborhoods in the Austin area and travel to both urban and suburban neighborhoods without charging extra fees. Contact individual handymen to see which of these neighborhoods below they serve.

Robert Picardo made two appearances on the show as Tim's neighbor, Joe "The Meat Man" Morton. He appeared in "A Sew, Sew Evening," and "Blow-Up," both early on in the third season. It was explained by Joe's wife Marie (Mariangela Pino) in the fifth-season episode "Jill's Surprise Party" that he had left her for a younger woman who worked at his plant (Picardo was no longer available after being cast as The Doctor on Star Trek: Voyager).


Silicone dries quickly and invisibly and doesn’t attract dirt, making it a good lubricant for drawer rollers, window tracks, door locks, bike parts, and other plastic, metal and rubber surfaces. It also helps protect metal against rust. Lithium grease is a long-lasting, weather-resistant (though somewhat messy) lubricant for garage door tracks, car doors and latches, and other metal parts that get heavy use outside. Check out 20 brilliant ways to use WD-40, another must-have lubricant for home repairs.

Many an amateur DIY enthusiast has spotted a job that needs doing and gone out to buy the appropriate tools, only to find that they're way out of their league. Book a handyman using the Handy app or website and you can be sure that they'll arrive with everything they’ll need to get the job done. In addition to your run-of-the-mill screwdrivers and hammers, your handyman specialist will read your job description before they arrive to ensure they come prepared for anything that your specific job may require. Don't worry about whether you’ve got the right tools for the job. Book a handyman through Handy and leave it to the professionals.
Some jobs may seem simple enough -- turning your attic into an office or a spare bedroom, a larger picture window in your living room -- but often require quite a bit more knowledge. If your project is going to cost over $500 a day and take more than a day or two, you might want to hire a contractor. These projects are usually fairly big. They will also be more likely to require permits and inspections, and will often require a crew of workers to accomplish.
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